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GERMAN SHEPHERD

JAMMY

£700.00
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GERMAN SHEPHERD

ANDY

£700.00
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GERMAN SHEPHERD

MIRA

£700.00
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GERMAN SHEPHERD

MIKEY

£800.00
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GERMAN SHEPHERD

Halley

£700.00
BUY PUPPY

GERMAN SHEPHERD

JAMMY

£700.00
BUY PUPPY

GERMAN SHEPHERD

ANDY

£700.00
BUY PUPPY

GERMAN SHEPHERD

MIRA

£700.00
BUY PUPPY

GERMAN SHEPHERD

MIKEY

£800.00
BUY PUPPY

GERMAN SHEPHERD

Halley

£700.00
BUY PUPPY

About Our Dogs

CARE

Originally bred to herd flocks all day, German Shepherds are built for action. This means they’ve got lots of energy that they need to burn off with daily exercise.

If you leave them alone for long periods of time without exercise, expect trouble. Boredom and inactivity lead to behavior problems—chewing, digging, and barking. The German Shepherd desperately needs to exercise both their body (jogging, a romp at the dog park) and their mind (training exercises like agility or obedience competitions).

Like many herding breeds, German Shepherds are barkers. Barking isn’t necessarily a problem, but it can be if the dog is bored. Learning the “Quiet” command should be part of every German Shepherd’s obedience training.

German Shepherds like to chew, and their powerful jaws can destroy most materials. If they pick the wrong thing to gnaw on, they can damage their teeth, swallow something that makes them sick, or even choke. Save your dog, and your belongings, by giving them safe chew toys and bones so they can entertain themselves when you’re not playing with them.

FEEDING

A German Shepherd Dog diet should be formulated for a large-sized breed with high energy and exercise needs. You should consult your veterinarian or professional nutritionist for advice on what to feed your German Shepherd Dog and the correct portion sizes. Their dietary needs will change as they grow from puppyhood to adulthood and senior age. Stay on top of these nutritional requirements.

You’ll need to take special care with feeding and exercising a German Shepherd puppy, however. German Shepherds grow very rapidly between the age of four and seven months, making them susceptible to bone disorders. They do well on a high-quality, low-calorie diet that keeps them from growing too fast.

And don’t let your German puppy run, jump, or play on hard surfaces like pavement until they’re at least two years old and their joints are fully formed. It’s fine for puppies to play on grass, though, and puppy agility, with its inch-high jumps, is okay.

Overfeeding your German Shepherd and letting them pack on the pounds can cause joint problems, as well as other health conditions. Limit treats, keep them active, and serve them regular meals rather than leaving food available at all times.

COAT COLOR AND GROOMING

The German Shepherd was originally bred to herd flocks in harsh climates, and their medium-length double coat fits the job perfectly, acting as protection the dog from rain and snow and resistant to picking up burrs and dirt.

The coat types of the German Shepherd are as varied as their color. Some German Shepherds are longhaired. However, the “ideal” German Shepherd has a double coat of medium length. The outer coat is dense with straight hair that lies close to the body, and is sometimes wavy and wiry.

The coat comes in variety of colors and patterns including black; black and cream; black and red; black and silver; black and tan; blue; gray; liver; sable; and white. The American Kennel Club doesn’t recognize white as a color for this breed, however, and won’t let white German Shepherds compete in conformation shows, although they’re allowed in other competitions.

Sometimes jokingly called “German shedders,” the breed sheds year-round, and generally “blows”—sheds a lot of hair at once, like a snowstorm—twice a year. If you want a German Shepherd, be prepared for hair on your black pants, on your white couch, and pretty much all over the house.

There’s no magic solution to shedding, and we just have to accept it. However, brushing two to three times a week will help more of the hair come out in a brush, rather than on your furnishings. And a sturdy vacuum cleaner doesn’t hurt either.

Bathing the dog too often strips the coat of oils that keep it healthy, so start running the bathwater only if your dog really needs it. It shouldn’t be that often; despite their notoriety as a shedder, the German Shepherd tends to be fairly clean and odorless.

The nails need to be trimmed once a month, and the ears checked once a week for dirt, redness, or a bad odor that can indicate an infection, then wiped out weekly with a cotton ball dampened with gentle, pH-balanced ear cleaner to prevent problems.

German Shepherds love to chew, and the habit helps keep their teeth clean. Give them sturdy, safe dental chew toys or bones, and they’ll be fighting tartar buildup as they gnaw, especially on the back molars. Brushing their teeth with a soft toothbrush and doggy toothpaste also helps keep gums and teeth in good shape.

Children And Other Pets

If they’re well-trained and have had plenty of exposure to kids, especially as a puppy, a German Shepherd is a great companion for children. In fact, some say they’re a cross between a babysitter and a cop, both gentle with, and protective of, the children in their family.

This is a big dog, though, capable of mistakenly bumping a toddler or small child. True to their reserved nature, they’re not tail-wagging friendly with kids they don’t know, but they’re generally trustworthy.

The German Shepherd can also live peacefully with other dogs and pets, as long as they’re taught to do so from puppyhood. Introducing an adult German Shepherd to a household with other pets can be more difficult if the dog isn’t used to getting along with other dogs or cats. You may need to hire a professional trainer to help, or get advice from the rescue organization if that’s where you acquired the adult German Shepherd.